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How Childhood Trauma Can Impact Your Physical Health

Mindful Healing_How Childhood Trauma Can Impact Your Physical Health

There is a consensus in the wellness community that there exists a mind-body connection. Mental health contributes to physical health. PTSD and Trauma can have an immediate impact on brain chemistry. In youth, this can also impact the development of the neurocircuitry. There can also be long-term physical impacts on the body that can lead to cardiovascular disease and high blood pressure leading to heart attack and strokes.

Let’s Talk Brain Impact

Stress creates a chain reaction that starts in the brain. In the short term, your emotional processor, the amygdala, sends signals to your command center, the hypothalamus, to increase heart rate, deeper intake of oxygen, more adrenaline, and cortisol is released to compensate for the energy spent during the chain of events.

This chain reaction is beneficial under moderation, but with PTSD these signals are always being sent and it can be a non-stop continuous chain reaction. In short, you produce too much cortisol which can kill brain cells and even reduce the size of the brain.

PTSD Impact on the Heart

We should add the caveat that there needs to be more research on the correlation between stress and PTSD and heart disease, but it is agreed that people with PTSD have a higher risk of heart disease. This means that PTSD may also lead to behaviors that are directly related to heart disease like substance abuse. Even if we remove those factors, PTSD also leads to physical contributions of heart disease like high blood pressure and increased cholesterol levels.

PTSD Impact on the Rest of the Body

Under stress, your liver produces extra blood sugar to give you a boost of energy. If this becomes chronic you could develop type 2 diabetes and then a domino effect of physical issues can arise. It can impact a male’s testosterone levels and sexual drive for both genders. Finally, your immune system gets weakened and you become more susceptible to the flu and the common cold—as well as other infections.

PTSD Can Be Treated

When you have PTSD, it might feel like you’ll never get your life back, but it can be treated. More importantly, you are not alone. There are many people realizing that help is available. Treatment for PTSD can improve your symptoms (see list of 22 PTSD symptoms), teach you skills to cope with PTSD, and restore your self-esteem. You can find the strength you did not know you had.

Do I Need Insurance to See a Therapist?

No. In fact, at Mindful Healing Portland LLC., we accept clients on a sliding scale. We are currently accepting clients for our sliding scale rates.

If you live in Portland or the Portland area and want information or help with PTSD and Trauma,

E-MAIL US OR CALL US AT 503-878-8588 TO SCHEDULE YOUR INTAKE TODAY.

 

Car Accidents: The Number One Cause of PTSD

Mindful Healing_Car Accidents_The Number One Cause of PTSD

What is the Definition of PTSD?

In layman terms Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that’s triggered by a terrifying traumatic event — either experiencing it or witnessing it. A traumatic event can include a natural disaster, a serious accident, a terrorist act, war, combat, physical or sexual abuse.

What is the #1 Cause?

Most people associate PTSD with veterans exposed to the violence of war and combat. Others associate PTSD with a form of physical or sexual abuse. The number one cause, however, is car accidents.  Technically the term is motor vehicle accidents (MVA).

According to the American Psychological Association, “Over one percent of the American population is involved in a serious (causing personal injury) motor vehicle accident (MVA) each year and a majority will experience at least a minor MVA by the age of 30. MVAs are considered the leading cause of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the general population and car accidents are the number one trauma for men and the second most frequent trauma for women…”

How Do I know If I Have PTSD from an MVA?

In a previous article, we define the difference between trauma and PTSD.  It is best to get assessed by a mental health professional to determine whether you have PTSD or any other mental health disorder. If you’ve experienced a trauma and notice changes in your thinking, behavioral, emotional, or arousal, and it is causing you distress or impacting your functioning, it is wise to seek treatment to get help with whatever changes you are experiencing. You can also reference an article that lists 22 symptoms of PTSD.

Why Seek Help after a Car Accident?

The short answer is to reduce your PTSD symptoms sooner. According to a national survey that examined 8,000 individuals, 40 percent of those who did not receive mental health treatment for PTSD resulting from either an MVA or other cause within six years following the trauma continued to suffer from PTSD for as long as 10 years after the initial trauma.

By seeking treatment, reaching out for support, and developing new coping skills, you can overcome PTSD and move on with your life. People who seek treatment find relief from their symptoms and go on to lead a healthy life. It is also important to know that it is possible for PTSD to be successfully treated many years after the traumatic event or events occurred, which means it’s never too late to seek help.

Do I Need Insurance to See A Therapist?

No. In fact, at Mindful Healing Portland LLC., we accept clients on a sliding scale. We are currently accepting clients for our sliding scale rates.

 

If you live in Portland or the Portland area and want information or help with PTSD and Trauma,

E-MAIL US OR CALL US AT 503-878-8588 TO SCHEDULE YOUR INTAKE TODAY.

 

What Is Childhood Trauma?

Mindful Healing_What Is Childhood Trauma

First, What is Trauma?

The technical definition of trauma is exposure to a distressing event that exceeds one’s ability to cope, or repeated exposure to adverse events that collectively exceeds one’s ability to cope. It is important to note that trauma can happen just from knowing about a distressing event, even if that event is not happening directly to you.

What Are the Symptoms of Trauma?

Symptoms of trauma tend to be broken down into five categories: Intrusion symptoms, Avoidance symptoms, Mood and Cognitive symptoms, Arousal symptoms, and Dissociative symptoms. People who have been traumatized may experience all the symptoms, or just a few. For more details click on 5 Categories of Trauma Symptoms.

Can Childhood Trauma Impact Me as An Adult?

The answer is yes. The effects from early childhood trauma can be long-lasting and impact one’s life into adulthood.

Children who experience trauma are more likely to experience developmental problems in later years and in adulthood. Common developmental challenges for people who have experienced childhood trauma include: concentrating in school or work, reckless behavior, issues controlling temper, problems developing healthy boundaries in relationships, and acting out their trauma throughout life.

The good news is that it is still treatable.

How Do I Get Help with Childhood Trauma?

If you are reading this article, you are already on the right track. It is important to know that you are not alone. According to the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 78 percent of children report more than one traumatic experience before the age of five. Research shows that early interventions tend to lead to better long-term prognoses with trauma. Speak to a professional. Therapy can help with managing/reducing symptoms, healing long-term wounds, and helping you navigate life in a healthier way. In therapy, we can evaluate how trauma has affected the mind-body, teach coping skills, and learn methods to bring calm and relaxation into the mind-body.

Do I Need Insurance to See A Therapist?

No. In fact, at Mindful Healing Portland LLC., we accept clients on a sliding scale. We are currently accepting clients for our sliding scale rates.

 

If you live in Portland or the Portland area and want information or help with PTSD and Trauma,

E-MAIL US OR CALL US AT 503-878-8588 TO SCHEDULE YOUR INTAKE TODAY.

 

Is Childhood Trauma Impacting Me as an Adult?

little girl and fear

This is a big question and if you are asking, you may already be experiencing some of the long-lasting effects of childhood trauma. Adults who experience childhood trauma are twice as likely to develop depression and three times more likely to develop anxiety.

What is Childhood Trauma?

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, childhood trauma is defined as: “The experience of an event by a child that is emotionally painful or distressful, which often results in lasting mental and physical effects.” The first types of trauma that come to mind is physical or emotional abuse. Trauma can also come in the form of witnessing or knowing about physical or emotional abuse. Additionally, trauma can come in the form of surviving a natural disaster or losing a home.

Doesn’t Everyone Experience Trauma?

Not everyone, but it is common. According to the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 78 percent of children report more than one traumatic experience before the age of 5. These include sexual abuse, neglect, exposure to domestic violence, and traumatic loss or bereavement. Only a few of these get addressed, less than 20 percent, and can impact daily life into adulthood.

How Can It Impact Adulthood?

When childhood trauma is not addressed, it can lead to Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD can cause changes in your thinking, behavioral, emotional, or arousal. If PTSD is causing you distress or impacting your functioning, it is wise to seek treatment to get help with whatever changes you are experiencing. Click for more information on how trauma can develop into PTSD.

What Are the Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders?

  • Recurrent memories, thoughts, dreams, or nightmares that are about, or related in content to, the traumatic event(s)
  • Flashbacks, feeling disconnected from the body (some people describe it as though they are watching their life as it were a movie)
  • The feeling that the world is fake/an illusion or lack of awareness of surroundings.
  • Attempts to avoid distressing thoughts, memories, emotions, or reminders about the event.

For a full list click on symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorders.

Treatment for PTSD

With a supportive, trauma-informed therapist you can get great results with treatments. No two individuals are alike. This means that you should receive the care that is specific to you. Whether you have experienced trauma or are dealing with PTSD, therapeutic support can be life changing.

Do I Need Insurance to See a Therapist?

No. In fact, at Mindful Healing Portland LLC., we accept clients on a sliding scale. We are currently accepting clients for our sliding scale rates.

 

If you live in Portland or the Portland area and want information or help with PTSD and Trauma,

E-MAIL US OR CALL US AT 503-878-8588 TO SCHEDULE YOUR INTAKE TODAY.

 

Mental Health Issues Change from Culture to Culture

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The classic definition of culture usually expresses a group of people based on multiple factors such as language, religion, cuisine, and region. Mental health disorders differ from culture to culture. Depression in the United States is different than depression in Japan, or Kenya, or China. Our own personal expectations of how to experience the world change based on our own unique cultures, including the cultures of our home. Thus, mental health reactions and issues can look different from person to person, even here within the city of Portland, Oregon.

Why Does it even Matter?

It matters because when we focus on mental health, we are focusing on personal goals in navigating and experiencing this life. Goals and values can significantly change from person to person, as well as having a unique perspective about the world. A multiculturally competent counselor will not impose their worldview and values onto you, but help you figure out how to achieve your own personal goals, which may look very different from the therapist. Therapists who do not take a multicultural lens may try to impose their own biases onto you (and even multiculturally aware ones can too) and as such it will not be effective therapy because it no longer is about your personal perceptions.

Another reason it is important to understand that mental health disorders and issues change from culture to culture is being able to understand them as stress reactions and not as a disease. Cancer, no matter where it is identified in the world, looks the same, whereas mental health issues change from culture to culture. This is a huge shift to fundamentally understanding mental health disorders, stress, and personal development.

Examples of Cultural Misunderstandings

The culture we grow up in teaches us about how to interact with the world. A prime example of an American value and cultural value is eye contact. Eye contact is expected in the U.S. as a method of politeness, and a lack of eye contact can convey dishonesty, shame, or autism-spectrum disorders. Conversely, in China direct eye contact is considered rude. If a counselor meets with a client whose parents are from China, the client may not make eye contact, not because they are shy or ashamed, but because that’s appropriate. A counselor who does not understand this may misdiagnose a client or not communicate well.

Does the Health Care System Address This?

The health care system is changing and has become better over the years addressing mental health, but it is still a part of a system that treats mental health as a disease. This impacts how mental health is perceived and also impacts how people seek help.

Coping with the Stigma

Fight against the stigma that is reinforced by your environment. Don’t fear the incorrect negative labels. Get treatment for your anxiety or depression. Stigma doesn’t only come from others; you have to fight your own stigmas. It is not uncommon for you to believe that your challenges are from a personal weakness and you should be able to manage without help. These are natural healthy instincts and all the more reason to seek help. You are not alone, and you don’t have to be alone. Also, do not identify yourself with your depression or anxiety. You, in fact all of us, are much more than the issues that challenge us. We are foremost; family, friends, lovers, companions, and confidants.

 

If you live in Portland or the Portland area and want information or help with Anxiety Disorder and/or Depression,

E-MAIL US OR CALL US AT 503-878-8588 TO SCHEDULE YOUR INTAKE TODAY.

 

Fighting the Stigma of Mental Health

Mindful Healing_Fighting the Stigma of Mental Health

Stigma refers to the negative social views that are associated with a particular circumstance or quality. Within the realm of mental health, this is the feeling of, or negative perception about, a person with a mental health issue. Stigma is so pervasive that it is built into our colloquialisms; statements like “he’s crazy,” are used to describe bad behavior, which then creates an association between bad behavior and experiencing a disorder. This is unconstructive and can lead to discrimination both towards others and the self. Stigma creates many complications and misunderstandings about mental health.

Consequences of Stigma

Stigma can present a number of issues. For one, it makes people less understanding about other people’s suffering or conditions or causes people to blame others for their conditions. Let’s use another colloquialism to demonstrate this process. The phrase “she’s just anxious” can be used to dismiss the reactions of someone who experiences an anxiety. There are some major implications to that statement. It ascribes the characteristic of the disorder to define the person. We don’t describe someone diagnosed with cancer as “she is cancer” or someone who currently has the flu as “she is flu,” because we don’t blame the person for their health condition. The more proper phrasing that eliminates blame is “she experiences anxiety.”

The research shows some other jarring data about stigma. In addition to creating blame, negative views, and misunderstandings about mental health, it also causes people to ostracize those with mental health issues and isolate them. Research also shows that increased stigma makes mental health conditions worse. Sociologists and anthropologists have observed that societies that are more accepting of those with mental health issues tend to have people who have less severe symptoms and easier recoveries than societies with less acceptance.

Another challenge with stigma is that it is not just an external process towards others. We internalize stigma, which means that if we ever experience a mental health condition, we ostracize ourselves for having a health problem. Stigma is one of the primary barriers for those seeking help because not only do they have to deal with the challenges of mental health issues, they experience shame for having one in the first place.

Why Do Stigmas Persist?

There are lots of reasons. Part of it is that in a history of misunderstanding, the science of psychology is very young in Western society. The notion that mental health disorders are stress reactions is relatively new. The history of mental health has historical stigmas, misperceptions, and other prejudices that are passed down from generation to generation. The main book for diagnosis, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, used to have homosexuality as a diagnosis despite it being a very normal part of our diversity in sexuality.

Another challenge comes in with public education and awareness. Despite the fact that we, as a species, all have different capacities and challenges with our abilities to think, emote, and process, mental health is not a normative subject in any K-12 program or even in universities. Some notions of mental health disorders and what they are have only just begun to enter the public perception.

Another contributing factor to stigma comes from our model for treating mental health issues. Like the vast majority of health issues in the United States, the funding for treatment of mental health disorders comes via health insurance statistics. Health insurance companies presently operate on the “disease” model of mental health, rather than viewing it in a holistic manner. In a disease model you either (1) have a disease and are unhealthy, or (2) you don’t have a disease and are healthy. However, the science shows that mental health disorders are likely normal stress reactions to unhealthy circumstances, rather than an unhealthy process. For a great essay with more details click on why disorders are not diseases.

Another source of stigma comes from the multi-billion-dollar pharmaceutical industry. Let’s unpack that loaded statement. First, there is massive stigma towards pharmaceuticals in general that prevent people from taking helpful medication. Pharmaceuticals have a role in mental health in creating adjustments to disordered neurochemistry and is not a reflection of anything right or wrong with a person. They help a lot of people and I am of the belief that people should take them if they help lead to a healthier, better life. The problem is in the campaign to medicate misery and anxiety as a whole. Uncomfortable emotions are major communicators that tell us about our world, environment, and needs. The notion that one is experiencing depression, trauma, or anxiety and, thus, is unhealthy is untrue. Learning how to understand and process our feelings and learning to adapt to our environment are important developmental milestones that lead to long-term healthier outcomes. Misery is not a sickness.

There are other major sources of stigma and this blog does not have the room to address them all. Culture, family, and knowledge are all intertwined. Just remember, fighting stigma starts at home. The more open and honest you can be about your own mental health, the more capable you are of offering courage and understanding for others to do the same.

Common Incorrect Prejudices Against Anxiety and Depression

It is important to identify misconceptions and realize why they are inaccurate. There is the notion that people suffering from depression lack willpower and need to pull themselves up by their bootstraps. Another misconception is that people suffering from anxiety have a weak personality, lack courage, or are just indecisive. There is no truth to either of those statements and the mentality of “just deal with it,” does nothing to actually fix legitimate psychological struggles. Anxiety and depression are not due to a lack of willpower or weakness. Nobody chooses depression or anxiety. There is strength to those who are surviving their struggle, and courage to working through it.

Coping with the Stigma

Begin with awareness. It starts with learning to differentiate between what are common misconceptions as opposed to what reflects reality. Know that whatever you’re experiencing or that others are experiencing isn’t due to some huge flaw but the result of some sort of internal reaction to environmental factors. If you are struggling with a mental health issue, you may experience fear of labels or judgment. If someone you know or love is struggling, you may struggle with your judgments towards that person’s plight. Those experiences of fear are ok and natural; how you respond to it will help determine the outcomes. Being able to work through fear and accept that what is going on is real, and not a reflection of value, is huge. Being able to lend a compassionate hand and listen to what’s going on can also make a big difference. Get treatment for anxiety or depression. Stigma doesn’t only come from others; you must fight your own stigmas. You are not alone, and you don’t have to be alone. Also, do not identify yourself with your own depression or anxiety. We are much more than the issues that challenge us.

 

If you live in Portland or the Portland area and want information or help with Anxiety Disorder and/or Depression,

E-MAIL US OR CALL US AT 503-878-8588 TO SCHEDULE YOUR INTAKE TODAY.

 

Can I Have Anxiety and Depression? What is the Difference?

Mindful Healing_Can I Have Anxiety and Depression_ What is the Difference_01

Yes, anxiety and depression are comorbid conditions. It is not uncommon to feel anxious when depressed and feel depressed when struggling with anxiety. From a symptomology and diagnostic standpoint, anxiety and depression are two distinct conditions, although the most recent version of the DSM cites a version of depression known as Depression with Anxious Distress as its own diagnosis.  The symptoms, causes, and treatments of these disorders often overlap.

WHAT IS ANXIETY?

Anxiety, in general, is a sense of doubt and vulnerability of future events. Anxiety becomes unhealthy when it interferes with daily life, relationships, sleep or your ability to relax and feel well.  Symptoms of anxiety can vary. The three common ones are (1) worry, or guilt that is difficult to let go or control; (2) feeling nervous, restless or tense; and (3) racing thoughts. Click the following link for an extended definition of anxiety.

WHAT IS DEPRESSION?

As opposed to anxiety, depression is not concerned with what might happen. Rather, it is a challenge with mood and energy. Depression is a mood disorder which causes either persisting sadness, feelings of emptiness, loss of pleasure, loss of interest, or general irritability. Common symptoms include hopelessness and feeling empty or detached. You may have outbursts of crying or lack of motivation for things you normally do. Click the following link for a broader definition of depression.

BOTH ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION HAVE SIMILAR TREATMENTS

This is sometimes why the differences between depression and anxiety are confused. A person with anxiety may be treated with Mindfulness, Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Rogerian Therapy, Exposure Therapy, Existential Therapy or anti-depressant medications, to name just a few treatment options. It does not necessarily mean that a person with an anxiety disorder is experiencing depression, but it is not uncommon to feel depressed as a reaction to anxiety.

HOW A THERAPIST CAN HELP

It is normal to keep these concerns to yourself. It is also normal to feel doubt if you are truly struggling with anxiety or depression. Bring your doubts to a therapist and get help from a trained professional who understands your concerns.

DO I NEED INSURANCE TO SEE A THERAPIST?

No. In fact, at Mindful Healing, we accept clients on a sliding scale. We are currently accepting clients for our sliding scale rates.

 

If you live in Portland or the Portland area and want information or help with Anxiety Disorder and/or Depression,

E-MAIL US OR CALL US AT 503-878-8588 TO SCHEDULE YOUR INTAKE TODAY.

 

When to Get Help with Anxiety in Portland

Mindful Healing_When to Get Help with Anxiety in PortlandI

If you struggle with Anxiety, you are not alone. Although anxiety awareness is becoming more prevalent, it can still be a tough subject to bring up. It is important to know that you are not alone. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, over 18% of adults struggle with anxiety. That is almost 1 in 5 people. Research has yet to determine what causes anxiety, but we know it can be treated.

Seeking help is the first step to confronting anxiety. Below are common struggles for those who suffer from anxiety issues.

FEELING OF TENSION

When struggling with anxiety, it can impact you physically as well as mentally. You may feel the most tension in your neck, but the feeling of tension can impact any muscle. Clenching, flexing, and holding are physical responses to feeling anxiety.

SENSE OF APPREHENSION

This can happen before opening a letter, before you answer the telephone, or before speaking to someone. It is a feeling of fear for whatever comes next.

IMPENDING DANGER

This is similar to apprehension but is a more constant feeling of being in danger. It does not have to preclude an action or event. A person struggling with anxiety may continuously feel in danger or impending misfortune.

WHAT CAN THERAPY DO FOR ANXIETY DISORDER?

Although there are multiple symptoms of anxiety disorder and different types of anxiety disorders, generally speaking, when your world becomes limited due to fears, it is time to seek treatment. Anxiety can impact your relationships, health, sleep, or work. It can even impact the ability to learn and pursue new things.

DO I NEED INSURANCE TO SEE A THERAPIST?

No. In fact, at Mindful Healing, we accept clients on a sliding scale. We are currently accepting clients for our sliding scale rates.

 

If you live in Portland or the Portland area and want information or help with Anxiety Disorder,

E-MAIL US OR CALL US AT 503-878-8588 TO SCHEDULE YOUR INTAKE TODAY.

 

Where to Start When Feeling Anxiety and Stress

Anxiety and Stress Group

We are wired for anxiety. All of us. When you feel like you are struggling with anxiety and stress, it is important to remind yourself that you are not alone, and many people struggle with anxiety and stress every day. For some, the anxiety can become a disorder and it begins to impact relationships, work, and even health. By reading this article, you have already taken your first step to get help with anxiety. Anxiety can be treatable with counseling and therapy.

What is the Difference Between Regular Anxiety and an Anxiety Disorder?

Anxiety is a normal part of life. Anxiety is an activating emotion which helps us deal with a challenge, or fear in our future. Having a healthy concern about a situation can help you anticipate possible problems and discover better ways of handling them in advance. However, people with anxiety disorders experience frequent worry or fear that interferes with everyday life, relationships, work, or it causes an inordinate amount of distress compared to normative anxiety.

3 Tips That Help with Panic Attacks

When anxiety strikes, panic attacks can follow. Here are a few reminders you can use to reduce the severity of your attacks.

  1. Breathe: There are many techniques and numbers to count—but for the most part, if you focus on taking long, deep breaths, your body and mind will slow down with your breathing.
  2. No Time Traveling: Anxiety can take you out of the present. It can make you worry about consequences in the future and blame yourself for actions in the past. Ask yourself: What’s happening right now? Am I safe? Is there anything that needs to be done right now? If not, give yourself permission to check in later.
  3. Take Any Action: Sometimes just standing up, taking a walk across the room or throwing something in the trash can pull you out of an anxiety loop.

Consider Joining a Social Meetup for Anxiety

In Portland, there are meetups, large and small, that provide an opportunity to socialize with others that have your same challenges. The largest meetup is the Portland Anxiety & Depression Group. As of the date of this blog post, they are 4,800 members strong and describe themselves as, “A Meetup for folks ready (with a little encouragement and support) to challenge the sadness and worry, hopelessness and fear, that keep us isolated from one another and at the mercy of painful thoughts, feelings, and events that seem beyond our control.”

What Can Therapy Do for Anxiety Disorder?

Although there are multiple symptoms of anxiety disorder and different types of anxiety disorder, when your world becomes limited due to fears, it is time to seek treatment. Anxiety can impact your relationships, health, sleep, or work. It can even impact the ability to learn and pursue new things.

Do I Need Insurance to See A Therapist?

No. In fact, at Mindful Healing we accept clients on a sliding scale. We are currently accepting clients for our sliding scale rates.

 

If you live in Portland or the Portland area and want information or help with Anxiety Disorder,

E-MAIL US OR CALL US AT 503-878-8588 TO SCHEDULE YOUR INTAKE TODAY.

 

Where to Start When Feeling Depressed

Close-up of woman's hands during counseling meeting with a professional therapist. Box of tissues and a hand of counselor blurred in the front.

An important place to start when you feel symptoms of depression is to know that there is nothing wrong with you and that you are not alone. Finding this blog post indicates that you are checking in with yourself and seeking help. There are many reasons why depression makes it hard to seek help. Many of these reasons are direct symptoms of depression.

What are the Signs of Depression?

Depression is more than just feeling sad and it can be a combination of emotions and impact other parts of your life. Some of the symptoms you may experience is a lack of energy, irritability and being quick to anger, difficulties concentrating, and isolating yourself from social situations with family and friends. For a more detailed list, check out our post on 10 (A)typical Signs of Depression.

Talk to Someone You Trust

If you are reading this, you have already taken the first step. You have sought to understand depression. That’s huge. Now seek someone you trust. If you have a family or friend to talk to, that is great—but someone you trust can also be a stranger. Sometimes it is easier to reach out to others that share your challenges or a professional counselor that understands what you are going through and can provide tools to help. Below are three alternatives to family and friends.

Depression Social Groups and Meetups

In Portland, there are meetups, large and small, where you can socialize with others that have your same challenges. The largest meetup is the Portland Anxiety & Depression Group. As of the date of this blog post, they are 4,800 members strong and describe themselves as, “A meetup for folks ready (with a little encouragement and support) to challenge the sadness and worry, hopelessness, and fear that keep us isolated from one another and at the mercy of painful thoughts, feelings, and events that seem beyond our control.”

There are smaller groups that deal with specific types of depression. You can click the following link to see all the meetup groups in the depression category.

Hotlines and Online Chats for Help

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255. You don’t have to be feeling actively suicidal in order to use this service — it’s for anyone in emotional distress. If a phone call is not for you, you can also chat through your keyboard with their online chat service.

Talk to a Trained Counselor

The good news is depression can be treated and you shouldn’t be expected to do it alone. Therapy is a collaborative process with the goal of healing and developing personal empowerment. Together, we will work towards your goals, identify barriers, develop grounding skills, heal wounds, and increase your cognitive flexibility. We also take a look at physiological factors like nutrition, exercise, sleep, and other health behaviors to help treat this complicated condition.

Do I Need Insurance to See A Therapist?

No. In fact, at Mindful Healing Portland LLC., we accept clients on a sliding scale. We are currently accepting clients for our sliding scale rates.

 

If you live in Portland or the Portland area and need help with Depression,

E-MAIL US OR CALL US AT 503-878-8588 TO SCHEDULE YOUR INTAKE TODAY.